‘De Munck’ Stradivari cello 1730 poster

£19.95 Excl. VAT

Our posters are shipped separately from other products. One tube can hold up to 10 posters. Save on postage costs by purchasing up to 10 posters per tube today.

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Description

This well-presented cello played by Emanuel Feuermann and Steven Isserlis is striking for the originality that created a new cello form. It is currently on loan to Danjulo Ishizaka. Includes full measurements.

‘The marvellous “de Munck” is striking in the originality of its slender form. The dominant feature is the large centre bouts, which curve in as deeply as those of the larger B form and are in fact slightly longer’ – John Dilworth in the June 2000 issue of The Strad

Additional information
Weight 0.1 kg
Dimensions 84 x 68 cm
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Vendor Info

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  • Store Name: The Strad Shop
  • Vendor: The Strad Shop
  • Address: 120 Leman Street
    London
    E1 8EU
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