Francesco Rugeri violin 1686

£19.95 Excl. VAT

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Description

Was the 17th-century maker Francesco Rugeri trained by Nicolò Amati? This violin appears to show the clear influence of the great master, with arching close to Amatis late style and f-holes showing Rugeris personal interpretation of an Amati model. Conversely, the head seems to anticipate the work of Carlo Bergonzi, some decades later. A fascinating violin by a highly regarded Cremonese maker. Includes measurements.

Additional information
Weight 0.1 kg
Dimensions 42 x 62.5 cm
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Vendor Info

Vendor Information

  • Store Name: The Strad Shop
  • Vendor: The Strad Shop
  • Address: 120 Leman Street
    London
    E1 8EU
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